Unnecessary use of an Adjective

Do you ever notice many people who use words like Unconditional or Unapologetic are often making an obvious point?

For instance, I’ve noticed some like to use say “Unconditional Love.” Frequently they are putting another person on notice as to how they should behave in a relationship. To love, regardless of the relationship, doesn’t require an adjective to improve the intensity of the emotion. All that is needed are reasons to feel that way about something or someone.

Love is a given; one doesn’t have to describe it in some unique way.  We don’t wait for someone to fall in love with us before we, in turn, love them. If they are our offspring, siblings, or parents, we love them because of our relationship. There are no other qualifications they have to go through to earn our love. The emotion is not always mutual or shared between two people. The explanation could be for numerous reasons. Whatever the reason, placing such an adjective in front of the word, love is not going to enable the other person to love you.

Say, for instance, your sibling, son, or daughter is socially challenged. They don’t interact with other people. Their social ideas are out of whack. Don’t have or can’t keep a friend, immature; they depend upon others to keep them fed, clothed, housed in a place to exist. Attempting to motivate these individuals is an endless exercise with no end in sight.

No one wants to take care of a grown man or woman. Relatives want you to succeed, show improvement, or at least try to become independent. If there are no signs that you are trying, one might be confronted with another adjective. Your relatives may indicate “Tough Love” is what you need, in place of money, or providing other subsistence items.

Tough Love may not be what they envision as assistance, yet it is the best remedy for individuals requiring motivation. Sometimes people need a reason to achieve the basics of need. Don’t underestimate a swift shove in the rear to get a person headed in the right direction.

Then there is the boisterous individual. The one who feels they have to get in your face to facilitate some response. We as Americans tend to overstate the urgency of something or the other. For instance, a man trying to make a point by stating he is “Unapologetic Black.”

The individual places his picture on a poster advertising his business. Keep in mind he wants some cooperation from outside his company. First of all, they can tell his race by looking at his picture on the poster. Or if there is no poster, those who he approaches will know his skin color.         

“Unapologetic Black” is a way of puffing up, sticking your chest out, which can intimidate the very people you need to cooperate with your plan. If not intimidation, then think of it as a turnoff.

It’s like sending an email to someone, whereas the entire communication is in capital letters. In such cases, one cannot get to the message because the all-caps smothering the wording.

That may not be the person’s intention, but someone will conclude the senders’ personality as uneducated. Or in the case of the guy on the poster, an angry, uncooperative individual.

As the face of your business, you have to show you’re able to converse in a way to satisfy investors, customers, or your employees. Any correspondence that reaches those people before you do will reflect your personality. In other words, your ability to listen to other ideas may get you that contract, loan, or donation.

One may consider these ideas as you are preparing a resume. You don’t know the personality of the Human Resource person. You must be smart when you are listing your hobbies. Somebody might be impressed if you are a dog lover, musician, or love Rhythm and Blues. That might interest the employer to place you above another individual.

Another way to think about this entire thought process is pretty much self-explanatory words matter in all types of communication. Words express how one feels, what they are going to do, even explain what one has done.

In summation, an adjective is a word or phrase naming an attribute, added to, or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it. Think before using them carelessly. Make sure they help you rather than turn people away from you. It applies to business or life.    

Peace, blessings, stay healthy, vigilant for our American rights. Make it a day in which Jesus Christ would be proud of you,

Codis Hampton II                                                                                          

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We present the republication of the Authors’ tour of South Korea as a 17-year-old GI with Unchon-ni, South Korea; I Remember 1962-63. Check out the details at https://outskirtspress.com/Unchonni

We are in a continuing effort to publicize, Gracie Hall-Hampton, the Arkansas Years 1917-1953. Based on the life of the Authors Grandmother. The Novel examines an era of Jim Crow that many in our society may have forgotten occurred against people of color. Meanwhile, we celebrate the publication of his fifth book, Misguided Intentions. A book where family relationships are questioned to the core. Read MI’s review at https://redheadedbooklover.com/gracie-hall-hampton-codis-hampton-ii/  Click on the publisher-Authors page at https://outskirtspress.com/MisguidedIntentions   

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Copyright 2011 Codis Hampton II, all rights reserved. A bi-weekly blog for your enjoyment